Charles Cooper launches his monograph at Annandale Galleries

Charles Cooper is a well known, accomplished, incredibly talented artist who has an impressive CV and career. For many years he has been part of the permanent stable of artists showing at the prestigious Annandale Galleries, Trafalgar Street, Annandale. Charles also works as drawing lecturer at the National Art School

On Saturday 10 September, 2022 at the Annandale Galleries Charles launched a monologue of his work over the last 40 years. Dr Michael Hill, Head of Art History and Theory at the National Art School, spoke at the launch together with Joe Frost who contributed the accompanying text in the book. John McDonald (Art Critic) wrote, “”It’s illuminating to read Joe Frost’s description of Cooper’s career and trace the evolution of his work. While the artist’s themes and ideas have remained consistent, the formal innovations have never ceased.”

I managed to capture a few images from the afternoon (selection pictured below). The book is available from Charle’s website: www.charlescooperartist.com

Charles Cooper – Australian Artist

I recently had the pleasure of spending an afternoon at the studio of the Australian artist, Charles Cooper. Charles is a long standing professional artist of high repute.

Charles has started an exciting project of producing a monograph of his work and required some additional photography for pieces he wanted to include.

I must admit I am really into the “surface” of painting and the surfaces of Charles’ paintings are lush and seductive which does it for me.

Charles has a long standing relationship with Annandale Galleries and his work can be seen if you click on the link.

New textile works by Rhonda Pryor

Rhonda pictured with one of her recent works

I’ve been photographing Rhonda Pryor’s works and exhibitions for many years.  Originally Rhonda was my studio buddy when we both worked in the same warehouse building in Lilyfield – me with my photography and Rhonda in her painting studio. Rhonda has since moved on to work in a studio closer to home, but she continues to commission me to photograph and document her eye-catching works, which combine painting and textiles, both hard-edged and shadowy.

Rhonda writes about her work: “While studying for my master’s degree at Sydney College of the Arts, my media of choice evolved to photography and textile work. However, I feel my work still suggests a painter’s sensibility in many ways and has influenced me in working with oils yet again after a long break. Recent textile pieces range from tight, abstract and amorphic shapes with linen, to more fluid, evocative manipulations – like catching sight of something but not quite seeing or understanding it (much like the process of remembering).”

See more of Rhonda’s work at www.rhondapryor.com

“Not So Long As the Night” – Emily Jacir exhibits in Turin

My portrait of Emily Jacir, taken in one of her favorite streets in Rome, 2016

My friend, the Palestinian artist, Emily Jacir has a solo show at her Turin gallery, Galleria Peola Simondi, Italy (until 14 October, 2021). The photo based works, film and texts are her response to the ongoing conflict between the Israeli state and the Palestinian people in and around her ancestral home and artist’s studio in Bethlehem. Jacir’s house is 200 metres from the “Apartheid Wall”, the imposing security barrier which was supposedly designed to protect the Jewish Israeli population but instead serves to isolate and and antagonise Palestinian communities. As Jacir states in the text by Francesca Comisso, “the wall does not separate us from Israel, it separates us from ourselves”.

Emily photographed in Rome, 2016

I have photographed Emily several times over the years and one of these images was used by La Repubblica newspaper in the review of her current show at Galleria Peola Simondi.

“Fire-Ground” – new sculpture by Margarita Sampson

“This work comes from walking through the fire ground after the 2019-20 fires in the Blue Mountains….the textures, the still glowing logs, the xanthorrhoea stumps, the profound and shocking stillness,” says artist Margarita Sampson.

It is great to photograph Margarita’s work and spend a couple of hours with her magnificent and unusual creations. I wonder what’s next….?

See more of Margarita’s work at: Click here

MMXX – Matthew Mitcham Annual Portrait

MMXX

Pigment inkjet on cotton rag, 112cm x 78cm, Edition of 9, (2AP)


Since 2008, every year I have taken an “official” annual portrait photograph of Matthew Mitcham, Australia’s gold-medal Olympic diver, award-winning cabaret performer and television entertainer, in my studio in Sydney.

Facing the camera with a direct, unflinching manner, each consecutive portrait is added to the growing series of similar portraits, which commenced when Matthew was only 20 years old, before his rise to Olympic fame.

Each portrait is taken under similar conditions, plotting the changes in his physical appearance and growing self-assurance. This particular 2020 portrait marks a bumpy year for all of us, facing the pandemic. It is only fitting Matthew is masked and “Covid-safe” for this one. MMXX marks the 13th portrait and the 13th year in this ongoing series.

I thank Matt for his support in continuing this series, in allowing a very public view of his “personal time-line”. Matt married Luke just over a year ago in Belgium I was fortunate to have had the opportunity to photograph their wedding (see blog post: Matthew Mitcham Marries). They spent a good part of 2020 here in Australia but only a few days ago Matt and Luke have left our shores for the UK.

The complete sequence can be seen at :

https://www.johnmcrae.com/exhibition-work/annual-matthew-mitcham-portraits/ 

The series is printed by the artist in an edition of 9, with 2 artist proofs, and is available for purchase.

Contact John McRae mb: 0419619161 e: john@johnmcrae.com

The First Supper – dinner with friends after lockdown

The First Supper, 2020 ©johnmcrae

It’s uplifting to see how clever businesses are able to find fresh ways to survive in the current climate, and to reward their loyal customers.

Le Coq, a well-loved restaurant in Darling Road not far from my studio in Rozelle, boasts a menu focussed on traditional French poultry dishes. Together with David Poirier, the owner of Le Coq, I recently set up a photo-shoot as a way to celebrate their regular clients at a time when business is beginning to return to normal. Inspired by Leonardo’s Last Supper, I created a series of iconic portraits of various local people from Rozelle and Balmain seated at a long dining table. The new series is called The First Supper. These culinary portraits will soon be hanging on the walls of Le Coq.

The Sydney Morning Herald published a short story in its Short black good food guide on June 20, 2020.

Works by John McRae as part of the project: The Mother in Art by art.es magazine in Spain

John McRae’s work is featured as part of “The figure of the mother in art: an embematic representation of love” by Pepe Alvarez and Fernando Galan, published in art.es in December 2018 (pages 59-64). It is part of the special issue of the Spanish art magazine dedicated to the theme of the mother. The article discusses the broader concept of maternity in Michelangelo’s “Pietà”, the female viewpoint as presented by the contemporary artists Nathalie Djurberg, Leiko Ikemura, Francesca Marti’, Isabel Munoz, Yoko Ono and Cindy Sherman, and the work of James McNeill Whistler, John McRae, Roman Ondak and Tatsumi Orimoto. John McRae is represented by Lois (2006), a portrait of his dead mother. This work was chosen as a finalist in the 2006 Olive Cotton Award for Photographic Portraiture at the Tweed Regional Gallery in Murwillumbah, Australia.

 As the art.esarticle states, “The figure of the mother, and maternity as a concept, have played an important role in the historical development of mankind as reflected in its cultural manifestations. The cult of the mother is as old as humanity … a link to the earth, making the mother the only real and tangible point of reference.”

The Museum of Love and Protest, Sydney

The Museum of Love & Protest was an inter-active exhibition at the National Art School (NAS) in Sydney in February/March, looking back across four decades of the history of the Sydney Gay & Lesbian Mardi Gras. It featured original costumes, photographs, iconic posters, rarely-seen video footage, story-telling, music and artefacts. This large scale group show celebrated love, protest, diversity, humour, pride and creativity.

The exhibition included my photographs commissioned by Mardi Gras for the 2012 and 2013 official Mardi Gras posters (MARDIGRASLAND and GENERATIONS OF LOVE), and also my grinning portrait of cheesey performer Bob Downe, attached to one of his infamous cabaret safari-suit costumes.

Spot the Arab – Exhibition summary, Ballarat

Spot the Arab opened at Backspace Gallery, Ballarat on March 1, 2018 (see images below) through March 18.

Local artists, photographers, arts administrators, friends and family of the artist, journalists, and the general public from Ballarat, Bendigo, Geelong, Melbourne and beyond were in attendance for the opening of “Spot the Arab” on the walls of this art space (housed in a heritage-protected, former police station), funded and supported by the City of Ballarat. 

Deborah Klein (Arts and Culture Co-ordinator), Cash Brown (Curator and Conservator at the Museum of Australian Democracy at Eureka) and Jonathan Turner (exhibition co-curator, Rome), opened the exhibition.

In particular, the “Selfie Stand” was a huge success. This is a portable photo-booth which has been set up, where visitors to my exhibition can use their mobile phones to take a self-portrait wearing Arab head dress or costume provided, standing in front of desert landscape backdrops I photographed in Israel and Palestine.


Visitor summary – Spot the Arab, Ballarat

An estimated 3,000 people visited the exhibition inside the Backspace Gallery. Many more people saw the exterior images pasted on the Backspace building and in the square (20,000 people passed by the gallery building on the Saturday of the White Night Festival)

SOCIAL MEDIA SUMMARY

A total of 20,000 people were reached through Facebook, Instagram and twitter.

3,507 people visited the separate Spot the Arab page on Facebook

John McRae’s personal photography page was visited by a further 3,393 people

6,585 people saw Spot the Arab posts via  twitter 

5,750 people saw Spot the Arab posts via Instagram (with 965 likes)

There were a further 1,000 likes via other media, and 125 direct comments

The Selfie Stand

From at least 400 people who dressed in the Arab costumes provided and took selfies at the exhibition, 33 people posted their portraits on social media.

John McRae in conversation with Rebecca Wilson

John McRae in conversation with Rebecca Wilson

Link to pod-cast with John McRae about his Spot the Arab portrait project and exhibition in Ballarat. Interview by artist and communications officer Rebecca Wilson, as part of her Western Connections programme.

Interview conducted in Sydney: February 12, 2018. 25 minutes.

https://onedrive.live.com/?authkey=%21AIRDJ5UAkzd8ViQ&cid=3BDE59690976ABBB&id=3BDE59690976ABBB%21148&parId=3BDE59690976ABBB%21139&o=OneUp

SPOT THE ARAB – Opens in Ballarat on March 1

John McRae – Spot the Arab – Amirah 2017 & Jaden 2018

John McRae will exhibit his latest body of work Spot the Arab for the first time in Australia.  Images from McRae’s Spot the Arab series were shown in June 2017 in Rome, at the cutting-edge Italian gallery  Il Ponte Contemporanea.  This exhibition took place in the centre of the “Eternal City”, close to the Vatican, in the heart of the Jewish Ghetto.


Name:    Spot the Arab – John McRae

Venue:    Backspace Gallery, Ballarat, Australia

Dates:     Exhibition runs from March 1-18 , 2018

                    Opening Thursday March 1, from 6pm – 8pm

Backspace Gallery hours: Thursday – Sunday, 12 – 4pm, The artist will be present for the duration of the exhibition.

The closing weekend of the exhibition will coincide with Harmony Fest (March 17-26), White Night Ballarat (Saturday March 17,  from 4pm to 2 am) and Ballarat Cultural Diversity Week (March 14 – 25).

Note: the Backspace Gallery will remain open from 4pm to 2am on March 17, as part of White Night Ballarat.

Address:          Huyghue House,

                               Alfred Deakin Place (Camp Street) Ballarat

                               Owned and operated by the City of Ballarat Arts and Cultural Development team

The City of Ballarat respectfully acknowledges the Wadawurrung and Dja Dja Wurrung people  – traditional custodians of the land.


John McRae – Spot the Arab series – Vanity Fair 2017

Artist Statement:

Spot the Arab challenges the viewer to identify who among the line-up identifies as Arab.  I query if this is such a relevant question in the first place.  How complicated life becomes when such things are treated as important.…maybe it’s more interesting to just experience the actual person in front of you, no matter how they are “dressed”, and to leave it at that.

Spot the Arab is a project based on portraiture, as a summary of various themes, ideas and concepts aligned to how I reflect upon contemporary issues of religion, race, gender, orientation, nationality and freedom. I present this work in a game-like yet very serious manner. It is a topical celebration of diversity, with a powerful message about tolerance.

Following 9/11 we have seen a growth in the stigma surrounding the idea of Arab/Muslim/Middle-Eastern, driven by incessant, hounding imagery of the “terrorist”. I resent this repeated, visual conditioning, which occurs every time you turn on the television or open a newspaper. It is easy to make fake computations and lose your ability to comprehend the subtleties and differences…so that you may no longer see the actual person standing in front of you.  How often does this occurs in all areas of our society?  How often do we close down communication as a result?  I decided to take this particular stereotype and use it to draw attention to the insanity of discrimination.

This show has been built around a photo installation, a retrospective of my portraits since 2002 on the theme of the illusions and stereotypes of what is an Arab today.  It looks at a selection of people I have photographed over the past decade in numerous countries and from different religious and ethnic backgrounds.  In most cases I have imposed Middle-Eastern clothing onto my subjects (who may otherwise wear jeans and a t-shirt) and have asked them to enact the role of what they consider an Arab might be. The sitters include men, women and transgender people in the “guise” of Arabs and dressed accordingly.  Spot the Arab focuses on social fictions of femininity/masculinity, recurring themes in my work.

At the end of the portrait session I asked each subject to exactly describe how they identify, since in this way, we can over-ride the preconceptions of imposed racism and prejudice….and whether they identify as “Arab” in any way. This gives additional weight to the complexity of each portrait.

For example, Ali, a Lebanese-Australian national raised in Paris but who is currently based in London, has frequently posed for me over the past decades. He provides a sharp description of how he defines his own identity.

“My ethnicity is Arab, I see myself as Semitic too. I also  have Persian lineage,” Ali explains. “Gender is very fluid in the male body that I adore, so I project the idea of Macho Male. My religion: Agnostic, Neo-pagan, Baphomet Worshipper, Hermetic Qabalist, Neo-Platonic, Sacred Whore (I go as ‘London Arab Master’ these days). I love Shia-Islam too.”

I tend to create works in series, often spanning different continents and time-lines. This introduces a multi-faceted and shifting perspective, never a single cultural viewpoint.  My specific fascination is to use my camera to break down stereotypes and visual codes, more important today than ever.  In my portraits, I try to capture sly or hidden messages, and then juxtapose these with more blatant aspects of drama, styling and emotion, whether it is authentic or staged.  It is always about intimacy versus theatricality.

John McRae, 2017

Lena & Obed, 2018


Spot the Arab with be running with a number of community based events which are taking place in Ballarat concurrently:

– White Night Ballarat (Saturday March 17,  from 4pm to 2 am)

– Harmony Fest (March 17-26)

– Cultural Diversity Week (March 14 – 25).


“SELFIE STAND”

Spot the Arab will challenge the viewer to identify who of the various models, dressed in Middle Eastern costume, actually identify as Arab. Viewers will also be invited to participate in the SELFIE STAND, an area in the gallery reserved for those who wish to take a selfie dressed in the Middle Eastern clothing (provided) in front of an Arabian backdrop. The viewer is then encouraged to post this image on social media with the hashtag #spotthearab. Once posted, the artist will print the resulting images and then adhere them to a wall of the Backspace Gallery, so that the visitors can become part of the exhibition.


John McRae – Spot the Arab series – Elle & Baptiste, 2015

For further information about the exhibition go to:

www.johnmcrae.com/spot-the-arab

See also the on-line article from “Genius Magazine” (European based arts and culture magazine)

John McRae: “Spot The Arab”


           

GENIUS PEOPLE MAGAZINE

I am pleased to announce that GENIUS People Magazine in Italy has published an article about my ongoing Spot The Arab project, aligned to my exhibition at Galleria Il Ponte Contemporanea in Rome.

GENIUS People Magazine is a topical, bilingual publication based in Trieste in northern Italy, appearing both on-line and in print form, guided by Editor-in-Chief Francesco La Bella, and Project Manager Mariaisabella Musulin. It focuses primarily on contemporary arts and culture.  

Click on the following link to read the article, written by Jonathan Turner:

http://www.genius-online.it/?p=18540

MMXVI – Matthew Mitcham Annual Portrait

It’s that time of year again……..

MMXVI
Pigment inkjet on cotton rag, 112cm 80cm
Edition of 9, 2AP

 

MMXVI – Matthew Mitcham Annual Portrait

Every year I photograph Matthew Mitcham, Australia’s gold-medal Olympic diver, award-winning cabaret performer and television entertainer, in my studio.

Each portrait is taken under similar conditions. MMXVI marks the 9th portrait and the 9th year of this ongoing series.

Will Matthew Mitcham ever age…is the question on my mind?

The complete sequence can be seen at
https://www.johnmcrae.com/exhi…/annual-matthew-mitcham-portraits/

The series is printed by the artist in an edition of 9, with 2 artist proofs, and is available for purchase.

Contact: John McRae mb: 0419 619 161 e: john@johnmcrae.com w: www.johnmcrae.com

Matthew Mitcham 2014 Portrait

The end of the year is fast approaching and I’m confronting last minute jobs to be done, absolutely before the end of the year.  Rationally, I know it’s just another day….but there’s this burning urge to finish certain tasks, leaving them in the year 2014, so that I may have a clean slate to start the New Year, a fresh.

One of those matters is the annual portrait of Matthew Mitcham.  I have been documenting Matthew for quite a few years now, almost 9.  Wow, how time flies!  At some point in the year I ask Matt to sit for a formal portrait for the purpose of adding a new image to the line up.

This portrait takes the form of a cropped head shot.  It is shot in a similar fashion each year, without being clinically precise in it’s recreation as I want to leave a small margin for variation and creative interpretation. So a few days before the New Year I am releasing the 2014 version of this series (pictured below).  For the whole series see the main web site under the tab, “Exhibition”.

 

 

MMXIV

MMXIV, 2014, Pigment inkjet on cotton rag, 112cm x 78cm, Edition of 9 (2AP)

Exhibition of finalist’s images – Shoot The Chef

If you’re anywhere near Star Casino over this month, drop in and have a look at the 24 finalist images from the “Shoot The Chef” competition, on exhibition in the foyer area.

Ali & Osso Buco

Ali & Osso Buco  John McRae, 2012 (Critic’s choice winner 2013 Shoot The Chef)

Finalist’s images on exhibition at: The Star, 80 Pyrmont Street, Pyrmont 2009 from October 10 to October 31

 

Shoot The Chef Competition 2013 Winner – John McRae

Ali & Osso Buco

Ali & Osso Buco wins the 2013 “Shoot The Chef Competition”

I received fabulous news on Tuesday.  I knew that I had been selected as a finalist in this years “Shoot The Chef”, what I didn’t know, until I read the paper, was that I had won!  I always assumed the winners of these types of competitions were gently informed before hand.  I wasn’t…. and when I received a text from my friend, Domonic, I merely said, “you can”t believe everything you read in the newspaper”.I’m happy to say it’s true and I’m going to collect my prize money on Thursday night at the opening of the “Good Food Month” at the Sydney Opera House.

This image is my interpretation of what a contemporary chef might look like, and a parody on the concept of fine dining.  It is part of a series of photographs I have been working on with the Sydney chef, Robert Zampogna.  Robert was the Executive Chef at the East Lakes Golf Course for about 10 years and last year he approached me with the concept to produce a cook book together, titled Hungry. Ali & Osso Buco, as the name suggests, is our visual rendition of Rob’s Italian dish, Osso Buco.  Ali  plays the role of the inverted aristocrat beautifully. He is seated, bare-chested, alone at a  table, his napkin to one side as he chews his candle-lit meal.  He stares provocatively at the viewer.  The setting is “grand industrial”, and the backdrop is a shot I captured on a recent visit to the disused White Bay Power Station.

I’ve always enjoyed seeing the images each year from “Shoot The Chef”.  I like the subject of food and the idea of the chef, it showcases some amazing creativity and this year I decided to be part of it…and I can tell you I’m glad I did.

Thanks to Ali and Rob for their brilliant contribution  and collaboration to this win.